APRIL

April 1

1780 -- British Capt. Johann Ewald records that “The county around Gibbes’ house has been made a park and depot for the siege, and the greenhouse is a laboratory.” 

1960 -- Twenty-four black students from Burke High School staged a Civil Rights sit-in at the Kresse Department Store lunch counter on King Street, changing the city's dialogue about the issues facing racial equality in America.

1996 -- The Charleston Naval Base and Shipyard closed.

April 5

1740 -- Concerned about the ever-increasing ratio of enslaved blacks to whites, the Assembly imposed a prohibitively high import duty on African slaves.

April 12

1861 -- The first shots were fired at Fort Sumter. The Civil War had begun in Charleston Harbor.

April 14 

1775 -- News reached Charles Town that Parliament was sending additional troops to enforce British policies (and taxation) in the colonies. (Source: Charleston, Charleston! by Walt Fraser, p. 141)

April 15

1732 -- Charles Lowndes paid Henry Gibbes 300 pounds to lease five enslaved people, because by increasing the size of his "household," he would qualify to enhace the size of his land grant. Grants were based on how many people were in one's household. (Source: Goose Creek: A Definitive History Vol. 1, p. 86)

April 21

1743 -- Charles Lowndes paid James Kinloch 600 pounds to lease seven enslaved people, because by increasing the size of his "household," he would qualify to enhace the size of his land grant. Grants were based on how many people were in one's household. (Source: Goose Creek: A Definitive History Vol. 1, p. 86)  

April 24

1870 -- Maria Louisa Porcher was born at Porcher's Bluff.

April 25

1715 -- Good Friday. In response to the increase in settlers' enslaving Native Americans, the Yemasees, Creeks, Catawbas and Choctaw tribes together attacked a number of frontier settlements about 80 miles southwest of Charles Town. They slew about 100 people. One of them, trader Thomas Nairne, was roasted to death.

1732 -- Charles Lowndes paid Henry Gibbes 330 English pounds to "lease" five slaves in order to enlarge his "family" so that he would be eligible to acquire a new land grant based on how many people were in his household. Six days later, he paid James Kinloch 600 pounds to lease seven more. (Source: Goose Creek: A Definitive History, Vol. 1)

April 26 

1775 -- In response to the news that British troops were being dispatched to the colonies, the Secret Committee of Five, created by the Provisional. Congress and led by William Henry Drayton, seized the arms and powder that were being stored in local magazines and hid them in private houses throughout the city.(Source: Charleston, Charleston! by Walt Fraser, p. 141)

April 30

1960 -- The News & Courier reported that the last pillar of the Charleston Hotel had been demolished at 3 a.m. the morning before.

Kresse Department Store is included among the stories of our Lost Charleston Tour.
Learn more about the Charleston Naval Shipyard in Lost Charleston.
The last pillar of the great Charleston Hotel came crashing down after the demolition crew had to bring in a 2,000 wrecking ball. We visit this site on our Lost Charleston Tours.
We visit the gravesite of Maria Louisa Porcher Wayne on our French Santee Tour.