MORE ABOUT CHARLESTON'S HISTORY

I believe that understanding linkages between past and present is essential to understanding our lives today, who we are and why we are the way we are. History gives us a perspective from which we can not only learn from past mistakes, but also emulate those things that are deserving of such. Struggling - often uncomfortably - with history allows us to take a long, reflective view of the complex cultures, traditions, laws and religious thought that have shaped us into the people and society that we are today.

On this blog, I attempt the impossible: to catalog as much as I can of Charleston's history, focusing on its lesser-known aspects and people that haven't made 

Places

Adger's Wharf

   

Bennett Rice Mill

Bowens Island

Broad Street

   

Castle Pinckney

   

The Charleston Hotel, 200 Meeting Street

Charleston Orphan House

Childsbury

Christ Church

   

City Market

College of Charleston

Colonial Lake

Commerical Club

Dock Street Theater

East Bay Street

Folly Beach

Folly Beach Pier

Gabriel Manigault House

Gaillard-Bennett House

The Guard House

Hampton Park

Henry Laurens House

Highway 17

Optimus E. Hughes House, 18 Limehouse Street

The Ivory City

The King's Highway

   

18 Limehouse Street

   

Meeting Street

Mepkin Abbey

Middleton Place

Mills House Hotel, 115 Meeting Street

Morris Island

10 Nassau Street

Naval Base and Shipyard

  

Pinckney Mansion

Pitt Street Bridge

The Public Square

Rainbow Row

William Ravenel House

George Robertson House, 1 Meeting Street

   

St. Johns Hotel

Sewee Shell Ring

  
   

Sugar House

S.C. Society Hall

Sullivans Island

Taverns

The Three Sisters

Timrod Hotel

  

Washington Race Course

  
  

Work House

it into the history books - a fact that no less diminishes their lives within the fabric of historic context. I humbly consider myself to be more of a storyteller than an accommplished historian, and I take this opportunity to express my deep appreciation for the scholars who are better primary researchers than I. I will do my best to credit my sources and point the reader to additional sources that provide diverse perspectives and are more expansive than logistics allow me to include here.

This page evolves every day, though in no particular order other than what captures my interest at the moment. Input and suggestions are always welcomed.

To see a chronological timeline of Charleston's history, click here.
To see a timeline of Charleston's history organized by dates, click here.
Read Leigh's "Do You Know Your Lowcountry?" columns in the Post & Courier .